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    Voc Emissions Posts

    CPI Replaces Catalytic Oxidizer with Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer at Bakery

    Catalytic Products International (CPI) installed a  TRITON Services Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer (RTO)  at a Southern USA bakery for VOC control. 

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    Topics: VOC Emissions, Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer, Bakery, Food & Bakery Case Study, Installation


    CPI Installs Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer at Fastener Coater for VOC Control

    Catalytic Products International (CPI) recently completed the installation of a new Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer (RTO) for the abatement of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) at a Midwest USA coater of threaded fasteners.

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    Topics: VOC Emissions, Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer, Paint & Coatings, Fastener Coating, Installation


    Drum Manufacturing and Reconditioning VOC Control

    One of the most common methods of transporting bulk cargo is a cylindrical container known as a drum, also referred to as a barrel.  These drums are used to transport thousands of different cargo including industrial chemicals, acids (and other corrosives), oils, solvents, paints, resins, adhesives and soaps.  Painted steel drums and drums made from high-density polyethylene (HDPE), typically called poly, or plastic drums, are used most often to transport and store such cargo.

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    Topics: VOC Emissions, Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer, Paint & Coatings, Case Studies


    Railcar Painting & Surface Coating VOC Control

     

    Rail Tank Car Painting and LiningTrains and locomotive railcars operate in harsh environments which degrade the exterior paint and protective finish over time.  For the interior of the tank and hopper cars, the linings must provide protection from highly corrosive cargo which can lead to heavy corrosion and premature coating failure.  These vessels require durable and long-lasting finishes as varying weather and cargo can strip away these protective coatings.

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    Topics: VOC Emissions, Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer, Paint & Coatings, Case Studies, Installation


    Flavoring & Fragrance Manufacturing Solutions for VOC and Odor Control

     

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and odors are natural by-products of many chemical manufacturing processes. The manufacturing of powdered and liquid flavorings & fragrances involves production phases where VOCs and odors can escape into the ambient air.  Recapture of the VOCs is important in the prevention of air pollution and smog.  Smog is formed when VOCs react with nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight. The reaction forms ground level ozone, airborne particulates, and some other pollution. FLavor and Fragrance.jpg

    Ozone has been selected as the standard to measure ground level pollution, a precursor under EPA’s criteria pollutant program.  Areas of the country that have ozone readings above EPA guidelines are ruled nonattainment areas and have stricter regulations for VOC, CO, and NOx emissions. This proves that although the compounds that create offensive odors may not be present in sufficient concentrations to present a health risk, they can diminish the quality of life for the community surrounding the manufacturing process.

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    Topics: VOC Emissions, Flavoring and Fragrance, Case Studies


    Optimizing VOC Combustion: A Case Study

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are pre-cursors to Ozone pollution and subject to EPA regulations. Thermal and catalytic oxidizers are routinely used to destroy VOC emissions from a variety of industrial sources. 

    VOC-1.jpg

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    Topics: Air Pollution Control, VOC Emissions, Thermal Oxidizer, Catalytic Oxidizer, Blog


    Controlling Fugitive Emissions, Part 3: Temporary Total Enclosure

    Fugitive emissions are what we call the uncontrolled release of gases into the atmosphere. This is something that happens regularly; in fact, fugitive emissions can be released when we fill our cars' gas tanks. The air that is displaced inside a gas tank that is being filled causes hydrocarbons in the form of gasoline vapor emissions to exit from the fill spout into the atmosphere in an uncontrolled manner. Some states seek to limit these fugitive emissions by requiring gas stations to use "Vapor Recovery" nozzles which capture this vapor and return it to the gas station's underground gasoline tanks, reducing the "loss" of gasoline and creating less air pollution.  

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    Topics: Air Pollution Control, VOC Emissions, Blog, Emissions Capture


    Controlling Fugitive Emissions, Part 2: Permanent Total Enclosure

    Fugitive emissions are the uncontrolled release of gases into the atmosphere. This is something that occurs regularly; in fact, it often happens when we fill our cars' gas tanks. The air being displaced inside the gas tank when it is being filled causes gasoline vapor emissions (hydrocarbons) to exit into the atmosphere in an uncontrolled manner. However, some states do require the use of "Vapor Recovery" nozzles to capture these vapor emissions and return them to the gas station's underground gasoline tanks, where the vapors become liquid again, reducing the "loss" of gasoline and creating less air pollution. 

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    Topics: Air Pollution Control, VOC Emissions, Blog, Emissions Capture


    Controlling Fugitive Emissions, Part 1: Close Capture Hooding

    Fugitive emissions, in their simplest form, are the uncontrolled release of gases to the atmosphere. Each one of us may contribute fugitive emissions when we fill our automobile gas tanks. The displacement of air inside the gas tank causes gasoline vapor emissions (hydrocarbons) to exit out the fill spout (un-controlled) to the atmosphere. Some states require the use of "Vapor Recovery" nozzles which capture the vapor emissions, returning them to the underground gasoline tanks. The vapors then become liquid again, reducing the "loss" of gasoline, as well as removing hydrocarbons from the air, which means less air pollution. 

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    Topics: Air Pollution Control, VOC Emissions, Blog, Emissions Capture


    Understanding Methane Emissions and the Climate Action Plan

    Here on the CPI blog, we regularly look at how environmental regulations affect your air pollution control systems. Today, we're taking a close look at methane, which is one of the greenhouse gases addressed in President Obama's Climate Action Plan.

    The Climate Action Plan, announced in 2013, is broken down into three different sectors:

    • Reducing carbon pollution in the United States
    • Preparing the United States for the impacts of climate change
    • Leading international efforts to address climate change

    The goal of the Climate Action Plan is to follow through on the commitment made by President Obama that by the year 2020, the United States Government would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 17% of those recorded in 2005. To accomplish this task, the Obama Administration has focused on the following 4 areas to cut carbon pollution in America: 

    1. Deploying clean energy through reduction of pollution from existing power plants and the creation of renewable energy from wind, solar, and geothermal sources.
    2. Establishing new fuel economy standards and development of new transportation technologies.
    3. A focus on reducing energy usage in homes, businesses, and factories.
    4. Reduction of other greenhouse gas emissions. 

    In order to address these tasks, it's important to be able to understand the details behind the causes of these emissions and how they affect the planet's climate. Let's examine methane emissions, which accounted for nearly 10 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2015, starting start with some of the basics: 

    What Is Methane?

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    Topics: VOC Emissions, Blog


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